TSU researcher Matthew Blair examines some amaranth growing in the university's experimental fields. Credit: Emily SIner / WPLN.
Research / science / Tennessee

TSU Researchers Hope The Ancient Grain They’re Growing Becomes The Next Quinoa

There was quinoa, there were chia seeds — and now, researchers at Tennessee State University are growing what they hope will be the next big superfood, if enough Americans can get excited about eating it.

Nursing student. Credit: Tallahassee Community College
Audio / Florida / science

Florida’s Public University System Wants To Woo Nursing Faculty With Incentive Program

Florida’s public university system is developing a program to address a shortage in nurses. The American Academy of Nursing has projected a shortfall extending through 2030.

Dr. Willie May. Credit: National Institute for Standards and Technology.
Alabama / science / STEM

Parker High School, Family And Community Helped Propel Top Scientist Dr. Willie May

A recent study shows there’s good news for college graduates looking for jobs in STEM fields. Dr. Willie May, a graduate of Birmingham’s Parker High School, struck out on a path in science more than 45 years ago. Today, he’s one of nation’s chief scientists and heads the National Institute for Standards and Technology.

LA Johnson/NPR
Alabama / Audio / science

Alabama’s Science Standards Get A Makeover

Alabama schools are getting new science standards for the first time in a decade. The state Board of Education voted unanimously today to replace old standards that some teachers say were behind the times the moment they were approved.

The view from a science classroom at nationally recognized Jefferson County International Baccalaureate School in Irondale, Alabama. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / science / STEM

INTERVIEW: Dr. Minda Berbeco On Alabama’s New Science Standards

Alabama’s State Board of Education is set to vote tomorrow on new K-12 science standards that would go into effect next school year. Most science teachers in the state say the new standards are better than the current decade-old ones. We wanted a national perspective too, so our Alabama reporter caught up with Dr. Minda Berbeco, Programs and Policy Director for the National Center for Science Education. He asks if she’s surprised there hasn’t been much controversy on standards dealing with evolution, climate change, and more.

Spectators take in the middle-school homecoming football game at Wilcox County High School in Camden, Alabama last year. It was the main event in the area that night. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / school sports / science

A Window On Other Arenas: Sports, Race, & More With Sociologist Adrienne Milner

You don’t have to be a scholar to know that African-Americans are heavily represented in contact sports like football and basketball, but underrepresented in “lifetime sports” like tennis or golf. Some casual observers have come up with simple explanations for that. But a University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist and author who studies race and gender in sports says the reality is anything but simple, or fair. Adrienne Milner, who played college basketball until an injury ended her athletic career, tells the Southern Education Desk’s Dan Carsen that she’s intrigued by inequity in all fields, but sports are special for her area of focus, for a reason you might not guess.

A slide in Dr. Gulnaz Javan's Crime Scene Investigation class at Alabama State University. Photos by Dan Carsen. NOTE: Viewers may find some photos below the story disturbing.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / science

A New Word, a New Way to Investigate Murders

MONTGOMERY, Ala. – Believe it or not, in a healthy human body, microbial cells outnumber human cells by about ten to one. Scientists, doctors, and health-conscious people are learning more and more about our “personal ecosystems.” But what happens to this individualized community of life after we die? Some Alabama State University forensics researchers are looking [...]

INTERVIEW: James Willig On “Gamification” Of Medical Training
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / science

INTERVIEW: James Willig On “Gamification” Of Medical Training

Medical education is always evolving. One way it’s changed in recent years is that residents are not allowed to work the long, judgment-impairing shifts they used to. Most agree that’s good. But how do you make up for all that lost teaching time? Some University of Alabama at Birmingham researchers think they have an answer: video games. They created a competitive educational game called “Kaizen-Internal Medicine,” or just “Kaizen-IM,” and a small but promising study showed that busy young doctors learned from it in their off hours. UAB’s James Willig sat down with our Alabama reporter Dan Carsen to explain. Willig starts with the downside of limiting residents’ work hours.