Post Tagged with: "football"

How Do National Championship Foes Alabama and Clemson Really Compare?
Higher Education

How Do National Championship Foes Alabama and Clemson Really Compare?

Most analysts compare defensive lines, secondaries, quarterbacks and ground games. But the Southern Education Desk decided to look at other facts about these two southern universities.

Spectators take in a middle-school football game in Wilcox County, Alabama. If Adrienne Milner has her way, these girls -- or at least more girls -- might be on the field instead of watching. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / school sports

Sociologists’ Book Urges End of Sex Divisions in Sports

Can you imagine a world with no gender divisions in sports? University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist Adrienne Milner can. Not only that — she wants to help make it happen. Along with University of Miami professor Dr. Jomills Henry Braddock II, she’s written a new book called “Sex Segregation in Sports: Why Separate Is Not Equal.” Our Alabama reporter caught up with her to ask what else she hopes to accomplish, and why.

Coach David Masterson (front left) stands on the practice field at Northeast High School in East Baton Rouge Parish before a snap. Credit; Amy Jeffries/SED
All In The Game / Louisiana

All In The Game: Athletes And Schools Tackle Tougher NCAA Academic Requirements For Potential D1 Players

When it comes to Division I football, Southern states including Alabama, Florida, Georgia, and Louisiana, produce the largest number of recruits per capita. New NCAA rules take effect for college athletes next fall. A 2.0 GPA and a decent ACT score won’t be enough anymore. To avoid the bench, freshmen will have to come in with a 2.3 GPA in core classes — reading, math, science, and social studies. And players in high school — where standards are generally lower — are feeling it.

All In The Game: College Athletes Talk Tensions Between Sports And Academics
Alabama / All In The Game / school sports

All In The Game: College Athletes Talk Tensions Between Sports And Academics

Across the South, college football is in full swing. But football is just one of dozens of NCAA sports. In any season, student-athletes are pushing themselves on the field, in the gym, and in the classroom. They get scholarships and generate billions of dollars. But they also get hurt and struggle with their studies on top of what’s basically a demanding full-time job. In Part One of our series, “Pressure and Performance on the Field of Play,” our Alabama reporter looks at tensions between sports and academics, through the eyes of the athletes themselves.

Spectators take in the middle-school homecoming football game at Wilcox County High School in Camden, Alabama last year. It was the main event in the area that night. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / school sports / science

A Window On Other Arenas: Sports, Race, & More With Sociologist Adrienne Milner

You don’t have to be a scholar to know that African-Americans are heavily represented in contact sports like football and basketball, but underrepresented in “lifetime sports” like tennis or golf. Some casual observers have come up with simple explanations for that. But a University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist and author who studies race and gender in sports says the reality is anything but simple, or fair. Adrienne Milner, who played college basketball until an injury ended her athletic career, tells the Southern Education Desk’s Dan Carsen that she’s intrigued by inequity in all fields, but sports are special for her area of focus, for a reason you might not guess.

Will and Vicki Tuggle outside their home in Vestavia Hills, Alabama. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / school sports

In Football Country, Concussion Awareness Brings Parental Dilemma

More and more people are learning about the risks contact sports pose to the brain. So even here in the football-loving Deep South, parents and young athletes are wrestling with a serious dilemma, one that could affect them decades later: to play or not to play. To help parents facing that decision, our Alabama reporter got some personal perspective from families who’ve already faced sports-related concussions.