Post Tagged with: "race"

A federal judge is deciding whether Gardendale High School and other schools in the city can pull out of the Jefferson County School System to become part of an independent city school district. Credit: Mark Almond.
Alabama / Audio

Federal Judge Weighs Decision On Independent School System for Gardendale

Federal Judge Madeline Haikala is considering whether Gardendale can pull out of the Jefferson County system & start its own without violating civil rights.

The United Daughters of the Confederacy donated $50,000 in 1933 to build Confederate Memorial Hall, which was then on the campus of the George Peabody College for Teachers. Credit: Vanderbilt University.
Infrastructure / Race / Tennessee

Vanderbilt Settles With Daughters Of The Confederacy, Pays $1.2M To Rename Memorial Hall

Vanderbilt University has settled a long-running lawsuit so it can rename Confederate Memorial Hall. The school will pay $1.2 million to the United Daughters of the Confederacy, which is considered present day value of the original $50,000 donation more than 80 years ago.

Spectators take in a middle-school football game in Wilcox County, Alabama. If Adrienne Milner has her way, these girls -- or at least more girls -- might be on the field instead of watching. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / school sports

Sociologists’ Book Urges End of Sex Divisions in Sports

Can you imagine a world with no gender divisions in sports? University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist Adrienne Milner can. Not only that — she wants to help make it happen. Along with University of Miami professor Dr. Jomills Henry Braddock II, she’s written a new book called “Sex Segregation in Sports: Why Separate Is Not Equal.” Our Alabama reporter caught up with her to ask what else she hopes to accomplish, and why.

Time for serious discussion in JohnMark Edwards' eighth-grade social studies class at Phillips Academy in Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Teaching Tough Topics

Teaching Tough Topics: The Real History of the South

Teaching subjects that trigger strong emotions and political divides is challenging. In the South, many of those fault-lines — racial, religious and otherwise — are intimately tied to its history. This week the Southern Education Desk is exploring how teachers tackle tough topics. Our Alabama reporter starts with an overview of some the major challenges, and some of the ways teachers can get around them. Please note this report contains language some might find offensive.

Spectators take in the middle-school homecoming football game at Wilcox County High School in Camden, Alabama last year. It was the main event in the area that night. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / school sports / science

A Window On Other Arenas: Sports, Race, & More With Sociologist Adrienne Milner

You don’t have to be a scholar to know that African-Americans are heavily represented in contact sports like football and basketball, but underrepresented in “lifetime sports” like tennis or golf. Some casual observers have come up with simple explanations for that. But a University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist and author who studies race and gender in sports says the reality is anything but simple, or fair. Adrienne Milner, who played college basketball until an injury ended her athletic career, tells the Southern Education Desk’s Dan Carsen that she’s intrigued by inequity in all fields, but sports are special for her area of focus, for a reason you might not guess.

At The Egg And I in Hoover, Alabama. From bottom left: Allinda Brown, Justin Barkley, Arnold Singer, Robyn Hyden (obscured), Sabrina Lewis, Rachel Osier Lindley, and Dan Carsen. Photo by Audrey Atkins.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia

Carsen Helps Lead Talk On Controversial Hoover, Ala. School Bus Fee Plan

Recently AL.com and WBHM-Birmingham hosted a lunch discussion on the controversy over the Hoover school system’s plan to impose fees on student bus riders. AL.com reporter Jon Anderson and our Alabama reporter Dan Carsen were on hand to facilitate the sometimes heated discussion and answer questions. Afterward, Carsen spoke with WBHM’s News Director Rachel Osier Lindley. To start, Carsen recaps how the situation got to where it is today.

Birmingham and Alabama Teacher of the Year Alison Grizzle. Alabama State Department of Education photo.
Alabama / Audio

INTERVIEW: Alabama’s Outspoken Teacher Of The Year

Alison Grizzle isn’t your typical teacher, or even your typical Alabama Teacher of the Year. The Birmingham City Schools math instructor is known for being very outspoken, even on third-rail issues like standardized testing and the Common Core State Standards. We thought we’d share her thoughts on those issues and more as staff and students return to school routines. Our Alabama reporter Dan Carsen recently caught up with Grizzle at an education conference where she was giving talks. But it turns out this award-winning teacher almost didn’t become a teacher at all.

From the cover of the recently released paperback, "Some of My Best Friends are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America." Tanner Colby, who moved to Vestavia Hills in eighth grade, wrote it after realizing that despite the nation electing its first black president, he and his white friends basically didn't have any black friends.
Alabama / Race

INTERVIEW: Tanner Colby, “Some of My Best Friends Are Black”

As Barack Obama campaigned his way to the presidency, self-described lily-white writer Tanner Colby began pondering — and then tenaciously researching — exactly why he and other white people didn’t have black friends. The reasons are complex, ranging from school policy to real estate practices to media image-making to church politics. But Colby dives right in from the springboard of his own life, recognizing his ignorance the whole way. The result: “Some of My Best Friends are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America.” Our Alabama reporter Dan Carsen caught up with the author not long after he appeared on MSNBC to discuss America’s persistent racial separation.