Post Tagged with: "segregation"

A federal judge is deciding whether Gardendale High School and other schools in the city can pull out of the Jefferson County School System to become part of an independent city school district. Credit: Mark Almond.
Alabama / Audio

Federal Judge Weighs Decision On Independent School System for Gardendale

Federal Judge Madeline Haikala is considering whether Gardendale can pull out of the Jefferson County system & start its own without violating civil rights.

Screenshot of EdBuild map.
Alabama / Race

Study of School District Borders Shows US, AL Economic Segregation

A wide body of research shows that students in poor school districts face real disadvantages. But the way the U.S. funds schools creates pockets of poverty right next to enclaves of wealth.

Time for serious discussion in JohnMark Edwards' eighth-grade social studies class at Phillips Academy in Birmingham, Alabama. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Teaching Tough Topics

Teaching Tough Topics: The Real History of the South

Teaching subjects that trigger strong emotions and political divides is challenging. In the South, many of those fault-lines — racial, religious and otherwise — are intimately tied to its history. This week the Southern Education Desk is exploring how teachers tackle tough topics. Our Alabama reporter starts with an overview of some the major challenges, and some of the ways teachers can get around them. Please note this report contains language some might find offensive.

Dr. Tondra Loder-Jackson. Credit: UAB School of Education.
Alabama / Events

Dr. Tondra Loder-Jackson, UAB Researcher, Discusses Impact of Civil Rights On Education

Birmingham City Schools have experienced segregation, desegregation, white flight and dwindling enrollment over the past 50 years. But can the system use lessons from the past to build a stronger future for its students? Dr. Tondra Loder-Jackson, a UAB professor in the School of Education, has researched the topic and discusses her findings.

Spectators take in the middle-school homecoming football game at Wilcox County High School in Camden, Alabama last year. It was the main event in the area that night. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Multimedia / school sports / science

A Window On Other Arenas: Sports, Race, & More With Sociologist Adrienne Milner

You don’t have to be a scholar to know that African-Americans are heavily represented in contact sports like football and basketball, but underrepresented in “lifetime sports” like tennis or golf. Some casual observers have come up with simple explanations for that. But a University of Alabama at Birmingham sociologist and author who studies race and gender in sports says the reality is anything but simple, or fair. Adrienne Milner, who played college basketball until an injury ended her athletic career, tells the Southern Education Desk’s Dan Carsen that she’s intrigued by inequity in all fields, but sports are special for her area of focus, for a reason you might not guess.

From the cover of the recently released paperback, "Some of My Best Friends are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America." Tanner Colby, who moved to Vestavia Hills in eighth grade, wrote it after realizing that despite the nation electing its first black president, he and his white friends basically didn't have any black friends.
Alabama / Race

INTERVIEW: Tanner Colby, “Some of My Best Friends Are Black”

As Barack Obama campaigned his way to the presidency, self-described lily-white writer Tanner Colby began pondering — and then tenaciously researching — exactly why he and other white people didn’t have black friends. The reasons are complex, ranging from school policy to real estate practices to media image-making to church politics. But Colby dives right in from the springboard of his own life, recognizing his ignorance the whole way. The result: “Some of My Best Friends are Black: The Strange Story of Integration in America.” Our Alabama reporter Dan Carsen caught up with the author not long after he appeared on MSNBC to discuss America’s persistent racial separation.

One of many Birmingham Civil Rights Institute exhibits that show the separation of black life and white life. Differences in the teaching of that history remain. Photo by Dan Carsen.
Alabama / Audio / Race

Black School, White School: Teaching The Civil Rights Movement

Most people know Birmingham, Alabama was a Civil Rights Movement battleground. But how is that complicated history taught in schools today? And are there differences between white and black districts? The Southern Education Desk’s Dan Carsen went to class in urban Birmingham and a nearby suburb — one of the wealthiest in the nation — to find out.

“Bring Back The White Kids”: A Fight To Integrate In Rural Mississippi (Video)
Audio / Mississippi / Poverty / Race / Segregation Shifts Series / Video

“Bring Back The White Kids”: A Fight To Integrate In Rural Mississippi (Video)

School segregation in Tate County, Mississippi, has spurred debate about the concept of separate but equal. Mainly, whether it’s possible.